Food, Food Movement, Gardening, Growing Food, Health, Heirloom Seeds, Heirloom varieties, Organic Food, Organic Seeds, Seed Collections, Seeds, Soil, The Living Seed Company

Start from Seed – Step by Step

Spring is in full bloom and your excited to get back into your garden or start your first one.  You know you want to start your plants from seed, but not quite sure where to start.  Commencing this venture with the finest seed is an essential part to the success of your garden and the quality of your fruit.  Not all seed is the same, even if it is the same variety – not all seed houses preserve the genetics in the same manner.  A lot of the organic seed sold at local nurseries is actually from China, so always call and ask your seed company where their seeds are grown.  Also, if you plan on saving seed, which we highly recommend, then you want to make sure that you are not buying hybrid seeds.  Take a look at our article on Heirlooms vs. Hybrids, it’s an excellent guide that will help you understand what the difference between an heirloom and a hybrid is.  Always buy open-pollinated seeds.

For those of you that ordered our Living Seed Collections, you have already received them already and you are thrilled, but perhaps not quite sure where to start?  Fret not, follow this simple step-by-step model and your seedlings will be growing in no time.

Choose what you want to grow your seedlings in, are they going into temporary pots where the seedling will be transferred to the ground later or will they be placed in containers where they will stay.  If you are transplanting, consider some of the great biodegradable pots that are available.  We have seen some made from  coir, coconut husks, DIY newspaper, toilet paper rolls and even eggshells!  Using a biodegradable medium will make the transplanting less traumatic for your seedling, if this isn’t an option, transplanting the seedling, will be discussed later.

Soil is the next key ingredient in the success of your garden.  Remember this is the foundation of where your seeds are going to start.  Don’t know why soil is so important?  Check out my blog post on the importance of soil.  Initially though, you will want to use a seed-starting mix and not potting soil.  A mixture that has vermiculite, perlite and peat moss are all an excellent combination.  This mix will facilitate with drainage and proper water retention.  Fill pots 3/4 full of the seed starting mix.

Next is the most beautiful part, when you interact with the very seeds that are going to grow an abundance of food to sustain you and your loved ones.  Read the growing instructions on the seed packet as some seeds have very specific needs and should be planted only during certain times of the year.  Ideally you will not be starting your roots or deep-rooted vegetables in small containers with the intention of transplanting, as they do not like to be transplanted.  If you follow the Moon cycles, ideally you will want to wait until the New Moon to plant your seeds.  Know what the desired depth for planting is – air on less depth and do not compact the soil, this is a very common mistake. Lightly cover your seed with additional starting mix and give gratitude to the miracle that is about to happen.

Once you have set up your flats, generously water them and place them in a warm location (minimum of 50 degrees)  the warmer it is the better their germination will be.  While they are germinating, they do not need light, but they need to stay moist and warm.   Remember the seed is a living an embryo that needs air to breath and water to awaken its state of slumber.  Once they start to sprout, they will need a source of light, either natural light (south-facing) or a grow light, placed just above them.  In either case, protect your vulnerable seedlings from drafts, pets  and any other disturbances.  Lack of light will cause your seedlings to become leggy, a phenomena by which the seedling is trying the reach the light and becomes tall and lanky causing them to become susceptible to the elements once transplanted.

Keeping the soil with a similar moisture level to that of a wrung out sponge is the ideal.  Too much water will drown the seed or cause dampening off, which means there was a high level of moisture and heat which created fungal activity, both situations result in killing the seed or seedling.  A watering-can usually offers an optimal spray with enough control.  Should you forget to keep the soil moist, you may jeopardize your seedlings and their growth may be stunted or they may die. There is a sweet balance of presence that is required of your seedlings as they emerge from the soil and begin to grow their roots.  Sometimes adding a plastic dome or even DIY yogurt cups for individual seeds can help keep moisture and heat in.

Once your seedlings have reached a recommended height, you will want to transplant them as soon as possible.  A big mistake of young gardeners is leaving their starts too long in their transplant pots.  Generally you will want to wait until your seedlings have 3 – 4 true leaves – refer to image below for a reference.  Make sure your garden is ready to receive your seedlings and holes have been made and are ready to be occupied.  If you have your seedlings in plastic 6-packs or non-biodegradable pots, you will want to disturb the roots as little as possible.  Turn it on its side and gently tap.  Always hold the seedling by its true leave and never from the stem or roots.

Make sure you acclimate your seedlings to the elements, a term known as hardening off.  This can either be done by leaving them in a sheltered place for a few hours during the day, over several days.  If you have a cold frame, you can use that as an ideal way to transition your starts from the comfort of your home to the garden.  Once they have fully hardened off they will be strong and ready to be planted in your garden.  Take a look at the diagram, to the left, for an ideal way to plant your seedlings.  Best to transplant towards the end of the day or on a cloudy day, this gives your plants enough energy to recuperate from the shock without having to be in the mid-day sun.

Continue to nurture your garden with water, regular compost and amendments.  Observation is a meditative part of being in the garden that also informs you if your plants need certain attention.  Read local gardening blogs and how-to books to guide you on this beautiful journey.  Prepare for the abundance and enjoy the harvest!

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About The Living Seed Company

We are dedicated to Happy Healthy People preserving genetic diversity in our food chain, through the distribution and growing of open pollinated seeds and educating about the life affirming art of seed saving. We preserve food diversity and educate about seed saving.

Discussion

2 thoughts on “Start from Seed – Step by Step

  1. Love your post! Awesome pics.

    Posted by Libby Keane | April 12, 2012, 10:38 am

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  1. Pingback: SPRING HAS SPRUNG!!! « Planting The Seeds - April 13, 2012

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We're dedicated to the preservation of the genetic diversity in our food chain through the distribution and growing of open-pollinated seeds and educating about the life affirming art of seed saving.

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